Amboseli baboon

Conditional fetal and infant killing by male baboons

Author: Matthew Zipple

In a recent article published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, we showed that both feticide and infanticide occur in Amboseli following the immigration of especially aggressive malesa behavior that is more common during periods of limited reproductive opportunities and low resources. This represents the first population-wide analysis of feticide in a wild population. Read More

Lifespan equality in humans and other primates

Author: Susan Alberts

Public interest in social and economic equality is burgeoning. In a recent paper in PNAS that examines both nonhuman primates and humans, we measured a related phenomenon, lifespan equality – a measure of whether lifespans in a population tend to vary a lot or be similar to each other. We used data from six well-studied primate populations – our own Amboseli baboon population, and also mountain gorillas in Rwanda, chimpanzees in Gombe Stream National Park in Tanzania, sifaka in Beza Mahafaly in Madagascar, muriqui monkeys in the RPPN Feliciano Miguel Abdala in Brazil, and capuchin monkeys in Santa Rosa National Park, Costa Rica. Read More

The Challenge of Survival for Wild Infant Baboons

Author: Susan Alberts

Surviving infancy is challenging for wild primates, as decades of research on species ranging from lemurs to gorillas have revealed. For an infant baboon, surviving the first year of life requires learning to identify and successfully consume more than 250 types of food, avoiding fatal disease and predation, and perhaps most importantly identifying and avoiding dangers from other baboons both inside and outside their social group. In Amboseli, first-year mortality has averaged about 30 percent over the four decades of our study, but has climbed as high as 50 percent during difficult times. Just getting through infancy represents a huge piece of the Darwinian gauntlet that every animal must run.

We have published a popular article in American Scientist magazine, in which we relate stories about Amboseli infants who did and did not make it through that Darwinian gauntlet. Read More

Collaborating institutions

Princeton, Duke, and Notre Dame

Princeton University

Duke University

University of Notre Dame

 

Amboseli baboon research project

Located near Amboseli National Park in Kenya, ABRP is one of the longest-running studies of wild primates in the world. ABRP is directed by Dr. Jeanne Altmann at Princeton University, and Dr. Susan Alberts at Duke University. The Associate Directors are Dr. Beth Archie at the University of Notre Dame and Dr. Jenny Tung at Duke University. Click the links at left to learn more about the project and our research.The Amboseli baboons.

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook

twitterfacebook